Recent Aussie stuff that somehow passed me by

I’ve apparently missed a few fat and body image stories in the Australian media recently, like the ones below:

Fat Lot of Good reports on a 100kg (220kg) who was told she was “too fat” to give birth in her local hospital!

As reported today in the Herald-Sun, a pregnant Melbourne woman has been told she is “too fat” to give birth in a suburban hospital. Casey Hospital is located in Berwick, an outer suburb of the capital of the state of Victoria. Casey Hospital’s web page boasts the facility has “state of the art fittings” and “modern equipment”, however apparently they are unable to take on the exceedingly complicated case of a pregnant woman weighing 100kg (22olb).

Incidentally, one of the commenters on that post says that:

Ms Graves has been told she can “pay’ to attend Casey – presumably to cover indemnity insurance. Apparently it’s okay to be fat if you have $10,000 to cover a hospital’s ass.

. If that is true, then the hospitals claim that it is not discrimination but merely “safe medical practice” flies out the window faster than a thing that flies fast.

Rachel at the F-Word posts about two (independent?) magazines that have recently been published in Australia, Real and Indigo, both targeted to the teen.

The increasingly strident anti-obesity rhetoric I see regurgitated in news out of Australia has been disturbing, but it appears not all Aussies have bought into the party line that thin is in. Two newly published magazines aimed at young girls and teens are challenging the ethos of what is beauty – and it’s not a pretty face and a slender waist.

Indigo MagazineSisters Jean and Erin Young founded Real magazine after seeing the high degree of eating disorders amongst their high school classmates, while concerned parent Leanne Koster founded Indigo, a glossy magazine for girls aged 10 to 14, with the catchline “Giving Girls a Voice.”

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1 Response to “Recent Aussie stuff that somehow passed me by”


  1. 1 moonchild Sunday, 27 January 2008 at 1:23 pm

    Casey Hospital’s web page boasts the facility has “state of the art fittings” and “modern equipment”, however apparently they are unable to take on the exceedingly complicated case of a pregnant woman weighing 100kg (22olb).

    That’s so wrong. Fat women give birth all the time without problems. Again it boils down to risk factors being equated with absolute certainty.

    Incidentally, how do they handle birth complications for ‘average’ size women? They are a small hospital so presumably they transfer emergency births to a larger hospital when and if they occur. Why can’t they just do this with larger women IF an emergency situation arises.


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